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The Cripple Creek District
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The Cripple Creek District

Part #: ARC-582146

Arcadia Publishing 


Cripple Creek District. As one of the last major boomtowns created from gold rushes in Colorado's Rocky Mountains, the Cripple Creek District, located just west of Pikes Peak, became home to thousands of men, women, and children from dozens of nationalities the world over. They struggled to establish homes in the rugged and sometimes inhospitable environment of high-altitude gold camp life. The need for a modicum of civilization's amenities in this roughneck enclave, which eventually became the Teller County seat, was stunted by mining's inherent injuries and illness, the harsh mountain winters, great fires that destroyed many area towns, and debilitating labor strikes. More than a century of pioneer living is represented in this evocative tour through famous and infamous local history, from the early settlers to the descendants and residents who still call the Cripple Creek District home.

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Southern Colorado O.T. Davis Collection
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Southern Colorado O.T. Davis Collection

Part #: ARC-131735

Arcadia Publishing 


Southern Colorado O.T. Davis Collection. When the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad laid narrow-gauge tracks into La Veta in southern Colorado in July 1876, it preceded Colorado statehood on August 1 by about one month. The southern Colorado frontier from Walsenburg west to Wolf Creek Pass had only a few scattered villages at this time, but silver mines in southwestern Colorado lured the railroad ever westward to haul out the riches. On the scene to photograph these developments was Iowan Ory Thomas (O.T.) Davis, who moved to Colorado in 1885 to work in the copper mines northwest of La Veta. Davis, backed by corporate sponsors from the mines and railroads, opened a commercial photography business in the Walsenburg–La Veta area in 1888 and, later, in Alamosa in 1906. The photographs of O.T. Davis collected in this book vividly capture a bygone era, documenting the frontier history of southern Colorado in the early years of statehood.

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Railroads of the Pikes Peak Region: 1900-1930
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Railroads of the Pikes Peak Region: 1900-1930

Part #: ARC-531250

Arcadia Publishing 


By 1900, the scenic beauty of the Pike's Peak region had become well known, making it a popular destination with visitors from across the nation. This influx of tourism along with the apex of the Cripple Creek mining boom saw El Paso and Teller Counties become a hub of freight and passenger activity. Over the next 30 years and through challenging economic times, the area would be served by 11 different railroads and an interurban line. The Midland Terminal and the Colorado Springs and Cripple Creek District Railways relied heavily on the revenue gleaned from Cripple Creek ore production, but as the output of these mines declined, so too did the coffers of the railroads that supported them. Larger railroads like the Santa Fe and the Colorado & Southern increased their regional presence through joint agreements and the expansion of local facilities. Still other roads had a more local flair, including the Manitou & Pike's Peak whose unique cog railway introduced “America's Mountain” to thousands of tourists. Mass transit also came to the region as the Colorado Springs & Interurban Railway became part of a legacy left by millionaire Winfield Scott Stratton to the people of Colorado Springs.

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Frisco and the Ten Mile Canyon
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Frisco and the Ten Mile Canyon

Part #: ARC-575490

Arcadia Publishing 


Frisco and the Ten Mile Canyon. Frisco and the Ten Mile Canyon tells the story of the once-thriving railroad town that served as the gateway to the towns and mines of the Ten Mile Canyon. Beginning in 1879, mines produced silver, gold, and other minerals while experiencing the usual boom and bust cycles. With the slow, painful death of mining and the curtailing of rail service, Frisco and nearby towns suffered. While the towns in the canyon became memories, Frisco experienced a rebirth and revitalization when the recreational landscape and economy replaced that of the late 1800s and early 1900s.

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Historic Railroads of Nebraska
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Historic Railroads of Nebraska

Part #: ARC-520353

Arcadia Publishing 


Historic Railroads of Nebraska. The advance of Union Pacific Railroad tracklayers across Nebraska was part of America's great adventure of the 19th century. It marked the beginning of the era of the "iron horse" in Nebraska-a time when the whistle of an approaching train became synonymous with prosperity and contact with the outside world. Historic Railroads of Nebraska takes a photographic journey down the tracks of the five major railroads and various short lines that helped Nebraska progress into a national center of agriculture and business. The trip begins with the formative years of Nebraska towns that were established along railroad lines in the 19th century. It then travels through the 20th century and documents the major changes and challenges that the railroad industry faced. Through over 200 photographs, this book chronicles the era of streamlined passenger trains, rustic steam locomotives, and a bustling Omaha Union Station. The journey makes stops at railroad landmarks, significant cities, the state's only railroad tunnel, and the legendary North Platte Canteen.

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Lakewood
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Lakewood

Part #: ARC-133982

Arcadia Publishing 


Lakewood, CO Book. Although settled in the mid-1860s, Lakewood waited to incorporate until 1969, when its population was 90,000. It was instantly the third largest city in Colorado and had it all. Lakewood even had progressive ideas for government from a nonmilitarized police department to incorporation of the patchwork of existing sewer, water, fire protection, and park districts. And if it did not exist, Lakewood's community-minded citizens created organizations, committees, and associations, like the historical society and Lakewood on Parade, to fill the need. This can-do entrepreneurial spirit makes Lakewood a livable, small-town, “All-America” city.

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Durango
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Durango

Part #: ARC-569758

Arcadia Publishing 


Images of America Durango. The storied town of Durango is situated on the farmlands of the Ancestral Puebloans, which later became the hunting grounds for the Southern Utes, in the Animas River Valley of southwestern Colorado. Founded in 1880 as the headquarters of the Silverton branch of the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad, Durango became the supply depot for gold and silver mines up and down the Western Slope. One of the few old-time cowboy towns in Colorado that retains the vibrancy of a self-supporting downtown of hotels, restaurants, and retail businesses, Durango has worked actively to restore and remodel historic buildings. Enhanced by stories of Spanish explorers, miners, settlers, early entrepreneurs, and the desperadoes of Western lore as well as Hollywood myth, Durango has earned a reputation as one of the Rocky Mountains' favorite travel destinations.

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Montrose
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Montrose

Part #: ARC-116374

Arcadia Publishing 


The narrow-gauge Denver & Rio Grande (D&RG) Railroad, the first rail system to challenge and successfully conquer Colorado's Rocky Mountains, arrived in the Uncompahgre (un-cum-PAH-gray) Valley on the state's western slope in 1882. Montrose was established to supply mines in the mineral-rich San Juan Mountains and provide a freight transfer depot and a shipping point for gold and silver ore. The US government had forced the Ute Indians off their traditional lands the previous year and opened the area to settlement. Land was quickly claimed and cleared as the booming mining districts created a ready market for all agricultural produce. By the 1893 repeal of the Sherman Silver Act and the US economic decline, Montrose was well established, but continued growth revealed a serious need for supplemental water. Selected as an inaugural project by the newly created US Bureau of Reclamation, the resulting Gunnison Tunnel has provided water since 1909.

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The Colorado Fuel and Iron Company
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The Colorado Fuel and Iron Company

Part #: ARC-127080

Arcadia Publishing 


With roots dating to 1872, the Colorado Fuel and Iron (CF&I) Company at Pueblo served as the principal heavy industry leader in the Rocky Mountain region, producing steel rails, spikes, and track accessories for the burgeoning railroad industry. Over the next 121 years, the company grew to manufacture dozens of other products used in the agriculture, mining, commercial, and residential industries, driving Pueblo to become the “Pittsburgh of the West.” As the region's largest private employer, CF&I also played a significant role in the history of American labor relations. A vertically integrated company maintaining its own mining, transportation, land and water resources, and medical, recreational, and steelmaking facilities, CF&I played a critical role in the history and development of the products that connected the Centennial State and, ultimately, the West.

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$21.99

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San Juan Skyway
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San Juan Skyway

Part #: ARC-580289

Arcadia Publishing 


The “scenic route” in southwestern Colorado means the San Juan Skyway, a 236-mile loop created by U.S. Routes 550 and 160 and State Routes 62 and 145. The Skyway wends through glacial valleys and over high passes between some of the most breathtaking, ice-sculpted peaks in the Rocky Mountains. Native Americans, pioneering mountain men, miners, and railroaders inhabited these slopes. Although the Skyway towns of Durango, Silverton, Ouray, Ridgway, Telluride, Rico, Dolores, and Cortez were first connected by wilderness trails and railways, the loop's final modern section of highway between Coal Bank and Molas Passes was completed in the 1940s. The rugged San Juan Mountains were the backdrop for exploits by Butch Cassidy and Wyatt Earp, but, as author Frederic B. Wildfang notes, the scenery is also “a syllabus for a course in geology.”

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Communities of the Palmer Divide
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Communities of the Palmer Divide

Part #: ARC-581903

Arcadia Publishing 


Communities of the Palmer Divide. Native American tribes once traversed the east-west anomaly of the Rocky Mountains known as the Palmer Divide as a passage between the high ranges and the Great Plains. Lying between Denver and Colorado Springs, and named for William Jackson Palmer, founder of Colorado Springs, the offshoot range divides the great Platte and Arkansas River systems. Settlers homesteaded, farmed, and ranched the area. Railroad construction in the 1870s led to towns supporting commerce and tourism, particularly in the western section of the Palmer Divide, in what eventually became known as the Tri-Lakes Area. The area drew tourists who enjoyed hiking, wildflowers, and the outdoors, and facilitated such local industries as ice harvesting, lumber milling, ranching, and potato farming. A vast area north of Colorado Springs, the Palmer Divide retains a picturesque rural nature and cohesive small-town feeling—creating such social events as the Rocky Mountain Chautauqua and the Yule Log Festival, as well as the enduring Palmer Lake Star on Sundance Mountain.

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Eastern Kentucky Railway
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Eastern Kentucky Railway

Part #: ARC-552767

Arcadia Publishing 


Eastern Kentucky Railway Book. In 1865, as the Civil War was drawing to a close, plans were underway in Boston for a railroad construction project to begin in Greenup County, Kentucky. Eventually the Eastern Kentucky Railway Company would extend its main track through two more counties, Carter and Lawrence. Spanning just 36 miles of main track from Riverton to Webbville, the Eastern Kentucky Railway became a lifeline for the economic and social activities of the people of northeastern Kentucky. Even though the original plan of extending the railway much farther south and bridging the Ohio River to the north never came about, the railway struggled along for more than 65 years. Many people who grew up along the line passed their experiences to younger generations; some, like Jesse Stuart, wrote about them. This volume will show life along the rail line that lent its name to the highways now running its route.

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Bridgton, Maine
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Bridgton, Maine

Part #: ARC-563206

Arcadia Publishing 


Bridgton, Maine Book. In 1768, Jacob Kimball moved to the shores of Long Lake in North Bridgton, building a store and providing boat service from Standish, at the southern end of Sebago Lake. Jacob Stevens soon followed, building a sawmill and gristmill on what became Stevens Brook in the center village. Ten power sites on this short brook ran lumber, textile, and other mills, as well as a tannery. Bridgton became the area's commercial center as retail stores and businesses sprang up to support the many mill workers and farm families. The first train on the narrow-gauge Bridgton and Saco River Railroad chugged into town in January 1883. Tourists and artists soon discovered Bridgton, and today the town remains a diverse mix of creative, hardworking people.

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$21.99

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Riding Denver's Rails
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Riding Denver's Rails

Part #: ARC-499150

Arcadia Publishing 


Riding Denver's Rails. In 1872, the Mile High City embraced a new way to get around and eventually boasted one of the largest streetcar systems in the nation. Enjoy the varied stops the transit system made as it grew along with the city, from the early horsecars of the Denver Horse Railroad Company and the steam-powered Colfax Avenue Railway to the running cable cars of the Denver Tramway and the electric trolleys of the South Denver Cable Railway Company. Though the last of the city's streetcars were pulled from service in the 1950s, Denver continues to expand its modern public transportation system with today's growing Light Rail. Join Denver historian Kevin Pharris on a tour of the city's glorious transit past as well as the modern improvements that are getting people onto the rails once again.

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$19.99

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Pikes Peak
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Pikes Peak

Part #: ARC-520629

Arcadia Publishing 


Before being "discovered" by U.S. explorer Zebulon Pike in 1806, the Pikes Peak region was home to a variety of different cultures, including Native Americans, Mexicans, and French and Spanish explorers. Captured here in almost 200 vintage images are the lives, trials, adventures, and leisures of some of the Peak's early pioneers and visitors, covering a span of almost 60 years. Along with rare images of the Pikes Peak area from the late 1800s, this collection contains a number of previously unpublished photographs. These include pictures of female pioneers traversing mountains in Cheyenne canons and other vicinities in the 1920s; Colorado Mountain Club members on their hiking trips in the area; pre-World War I memoirs and poems from local residents; and pictures of local prospectors, like Frank Nelson, who remained long after the large gold deposits were discovered. Also featured is the development of the surrounding communities and attractions of the Peak, including Colorado Springs, Manitou Springs, Cripple Creek, Cheyenne Mountain and Canons, Garden of the Gods, Canon City, Royal Gorge, the Broadmoor Hotel, and the Cliff House.

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$21.99

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Tooele Valley Railroad
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Tooele Valley Railroad

Part #: ARC-130264

Arcadia Publishing 


Tooele Valley Railroad. Shortly after the International Smelter offered economic salvation to Tooele's struggling desert community, the Tooele Valley Railroad became the town artery. Though originally built in 1908 to connect the smelter to the Union Pacific and Western Pacific lines west of town, the railroad became central to daily life. Hundreds of local workers rode it to and from work each day. As technology continued to change Tooele, the Tooele Valley Railroad shared Vine Street with the first automobiles—safety precautions required that the caboose, with a horn mounted to warn motorists, lead the oncoming train. However, the smelter's decades of prosperity proved short-lived, and by the 1930s, the town had fallen on difficult times once again. The railroad outlived the smelter, but operations ceased in the early 1980s, and the city had the abandoned tracks removed.

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$21.99

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Early Lakewood
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Early Lakewood

Part #: ARC-574417

Arcadia Publishing 


Since Lakewood's settlement in the 1860s, it has been a community in search of an identity, fluctuating from farm center to factory town, from Denver streetcar suburb to the map's stopover point between the big city and the Front Range of the Rocky Mountains. Once known for its fruit orchards and dairy and poultry farms, Lakewood in modern times has been home to the western third of the nation's longest commercial street, Colfax Avenue, and houses more federal agencies than any community outside of Washington, DC. Most of the buildings associated with Lakewood's agricultural and manufacturing past are gone, but the can-do spirit of the men and women who forged and fashioned the city's destiny as a microcosm of western American life from the mid-19th to mid-20th centuries is recalled in these pages.

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Rails Around Durango
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Rails Around Durango

Part #: ARC-548593

Arcadia Publishing 


Rails Around Durango. In the 1880s, the Denver & Rio Grande began building its three-foot railroad toward the San Juan Mountains alongside the Animas River and the budding community of Durango. The D&RG quickly established itself in Durango, constructing a depot as well as a 45-mile connection to the regional mining hub of Silverton. Over 60 years, the towns, the railroad, and the mines it served would weather plummeting silver values and a turbulent economy. By the end of World War II, declining freight volumes left the future of the railroad in doubt, but by the late 1940s, a growing number of train enthusiasts were journeying to Durango for one last ride. The new popularity of the Silverton Branch brought rail fans to the area in increasing numbers through the 1950s. Today the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad continues to preserve the region's railroading past and has become a unique aspect of the history of Southwestern Colorado.

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Colorado & Southern Railway Clear Creek Narrow Gauge
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Colorado & Southern Railway Clear Creek Narrow Gauge

Part #: ARC-529295

Arcadia Publishing 


In 1860, thousands journeyed to the Colorado Territory, beckoned by reports of gold discoveries in the mountains west of Denver. In the early 1870s, W.A.H. Loveland built a railroad connecting Denver to the Clear Creek Mining District-the Colorado Central Railroad. Over the next 28 years, other lines were established, bought, sold, extended, and merged to service the mining towns of Black Hawk, Central City, Idaho Springs, and Silver Plume. In 1898, the Union Pacific, Denver & Gulf, and the Denver Leadville & Gunnison were combined to form the Colorado & Southern Railway. After more than 40 years of dedication to the Clear Creek District, the railroad was scrapped in 1941. However, tourism would revitalize the area, and in the years to come a group of enthusiasts began to rebuild a portion of the old right of way. Toady, the spirit of the C&S is alive again, and rail fans can make the same journey over “The Loop” that thrilled tourists a century ago.

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Ouray
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Ouray

Part #: ARC-52199

Arcadia Publishing 


Situated in a spectacular basin surrounded by 13,000-foot peaks, the city of Ouray has captured the eye of adventurers from its beginnings, while the glitter of gold and silver brought prospectors to its mountains. The Uncompahgre Utes hunted and soaked in their sacred hot springs for generations, but about one year after Chief Ouray's death, they were removed from their homelands to a reservation in Utah. Mines and mining camps proliferated in the harsh, remote high country, where rugged terrain hampered the transportation of ore and supplies, even after toll roads and railroads lessened isolation. Ouray (pronounced “Yurr-AY”) developed into a Victorian community with families, churches, and schools contrasted with rowdy saloons and so-called “fancy ladies.” Ouray further embraced tourism after mining waned, and heritage preservation remains an ongoing concern.

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$21.99

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Pere Marquette 1225
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Pere Marquette 1225

Part #: ARC-112826

Arcadia Publishing 


Pere Marquette 1225. Images of Rail: Pere Marquette 1225 presents the history of steam locomotive 1225, one of 39 Berkshire Class 2-8-4's built between 1937 and 1944 for the Pere Marquette Railway. Although it is best known for being the sound and image behind the movie adaptation of Chris Van Allsburg's The Polar Express, 1225 has a rich history that preceded a life as a movie star. From her construction at Lima Locomotive Works and important role in hauling material from factories to the front in World War II to her unlikely preservation on Michigan State University's campus and eventual restoration, the history of 1225 covers nearly 75 years. The locomotive is now housed at the Steam Railroading Institute in Owosso, Michigan, and the story behind it will take readers back to a time when whistles in the night charged the imagination and the United States truly was the “Arsenal of Democracy.”

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$21.99

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Ohio Oil and Gas
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Ohio Oil and Gas

Part #: ARC-551715

Arcadia Publishing 


Ohio Oil and Gas Book. Forty-five years before the drilling of the famous 1859 Colonel Drake oil well in Pennsylvania, oil was produced and marketed from salt brine wells dug in southeast Ohio. The oil was bottled and sold as a cure-all medicine, Seneca Oil. In 1860, one of the first oil fields in Ohio was discovered approximately 10 miles southeast of these wells. The 1885 discovery of the giant Lima-Indiana oil field set off the oil boom of northwest Ohio, a period of land speculation and rapid oil field development that lasted over 20 years and propelled Ohio into the leading oil-producing state from 1895 to 1903. John D. Rockefeller's Standard Oil of Cleveland built storage tanks, pipelines, and a refinery near Lima. The Ohio Oil Company, now Marathon Oil, was active in the area and still maintains an office in Findlay. The Bremen oil field was discovered in south-central Ohio in 1907, setting off another oil boom, which included drilling within the city limits.

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Saving the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad
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Saving the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad

Part #: ARC-495473

Arcadia Publishing 


Saving the Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad. The Cumbres & Toltec Scenic Railroad has operated for more than three decades as a tourist ride over the breathtaking Cumbres Pass, ten thousand feet above sea level in the Rocky Mountains. The sixty-four miles of the former San Juan Extension of the Denver & Rio Grande Western Railway were saved twice by volunteers from the railroad graveyard. In 1970, the States of Colorado and New Mexico bought the railroad, which runs from Chama, Rio Arriba County, New Mexico, to Antonito, Conejos County, Colorado. New Mexico historian and C&TSRR commissioner and spokesman Spencer Wilson offers an insider's account of this triumphant tale of historical preservationists succeeding on an impressive scale.

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$16.99

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South Dakota Railroads
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South Dakota Railroads

Part #: ARC-532943

Arcadia Publishing 


South Dakota Railroads. The arrival of the railroad in South Dakota is directly responsible for the population boom and town development the state experienced in the early 1900s. Enticed by the promise of opportunity, many immigrants and East Coast residents hopped on the train and headed west, many settling in South Dakota. Railroads opened the doorway and made the West what it has become. Using over 200 images, authors Mike Wiese and Tom Hayes take the reader on a historic tour of the depots, trains, and wrecks that defined South Dakota railroading in the early part of the 20th century. Drawing on their immense collections of images and postcards, they tell a story of railroad development and local history in South Dakota.

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$21.99

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Kentucky and The Illinois Central Railroad
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Kentucky and The Illinois Central Railroad

Part #: ARC-566610

Arcadia Publishing 


The advance of Union Pacific Railroad tracklayers across Nebraska was part of America's great adventure of the 19th century. It marked the beginning of the era of the "iron horse" in Nebraska-a time when the whistle of an approaching train became synonymous with prosperity and contact with the outside world. Historic Railroads of Nebraska takes a photographic journey down the tracks of the five major railroads and various short lines that helped Nebraska progress into a national center of agriculture and business. The trip begins with the formative years of Nebraska towns that were established along railroad lines in the 19th century. It then travels through the 20th century and documents the major changes and challenges that the railroad industry faced. Through over 200 photographs, this book chronicles the era of streamlined passenger trains, rustic steam locomotives, and a bustling Omaha Union Station. The journey makes stops at railroad landmarks, significant cities, the state's only railroad tunnel, and the legendary North Platte Canteen.

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$21.99

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Park County
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Park County

Part #: ARC-132459

Arcadia Publishing 


Created in 1861, Park County is one of Colorado's original 17 territorial counties. It is named after South Park, which is the vast, high alpine valley at the county's center. By the time the first fur trappers and explorers arrived in the early 1800s, Ute Indians had long visited the area to hunt the mountain valleys and fish the trout-filled streams. In 1859, prospectors discovered gold along Tarryall Creek, ushering in a mining boom that gave rise to dozens of boisterous mining camps. Ranchers soon followed, taking advantage of the nutritious native grasses and raising cattle to feed hungry miners, often under harsh conditions. By the 1880s, the Denver, South Park & Pacific and Colorado Midland Railroads arrived, spurring the growth of new towns and opening new markets for Park County's minerals, hay, ice, lumber, and cattle. As mining waned, tourism emerged as a major economic force attracting visitors eager to experience Park County's authentic character and stunning natural beauty.

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$21.99

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Basalt
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Basalt

Part #: ARC-130462

Arcadia Publishing 


Once the site of a Ute Indian settlement, Basalt began life as several sleepy little hamlets. From the original Frying Pan Junction and later Aspen Junction, the town of Basalt is comprised of five areas. In the early 20th century, located midway between Aspen and Glenwood Springs, Basalt became the heart of the valley's mining, ranching, and farming operations as pioneering families homesteaded the land. Many hoped to build their fortunes along the tracks of the Denver & Rio Grande Western and Colorado Midland Railroads, whose rail lines merged in the center of today's downtown area. As the silver-mining era passed into history and the railroad operations ceased, so did the fortunes of early Basalt. Today's Basalt is a vibrant and vital residential and commercial community located on the confluence of two world-class Gold Medal fishing rivers.

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The Black Canyon of the Gunnison
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The Black Canyon of the Gunnison

Part #: ARC-569192

Arcadia Publishing 


The Black Canyon of the Gunnison River is one of the deepest, narrowest, and most inaccessible canyons in the United States. Very few explorers have ever traversed the 53-mile gorge in Gunnison and Montrose Counties. The canyon, one of the nation's wonders, has been the precipitous stage for an exciting history featuring Ute Indians, a narrow-gauge railroad, sensational explorations, and the construction of the Gunnison Tunnel—the first major Bureau of Reclamation project in history. The Black Canyon became a national monument in 1932 and a national park in 1999. Today it remains a crown jewel of Colorado's Western Slope.

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$21.99

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Mining Towns of Southern Colorado
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Mining Towns of Southern Colorado

Part #: ARC-599533

Arcadia Publishing 


Mining Towns of Southern Colorado. Lesser known than the gold and silver mines of Western lore, Southern Colorado's extensive coal mines fueled the engines for Western industrialization in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Of the numerous companies operating the mines, the Colorado Fuel and Iron Company (CF&I) was king. With a total of 62 mines, the majority of them in Colorado's Las Animas, Huerfano, and Fremont Counties, CF&I ruled the lives of countless miners in company towns scattered throughout Southern Colorado. Working long hours, often in cramped underground caverns, the workers emerged to families living in lonely mountain landscapes completely provisioned with company homes, stores, schools, and churches. Images of America: Mining Towns of Southern Colorado gives an intimate glimpse into the lives of these pioneer mining families.

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$21.99

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Silverton and the Alpine Loop
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Silverton and the Alpine Loop

Part #: ARC-131551

Arcadia Publishing 


Silverton and the Alpine Loop. As the ancestral hunting grounds of mountain people known as the Utes, the future site of Silverton was explored by nomadic hunters for generations. During the 1860s, Charles Baker, an early mining prospector, discovered some mineral wealth in the area and spread highly exaggerated rumors that brought in even more prospectors. Significant wealth was found in Arrastra Gulch along the Alpine Loop, north of Baker's Park. From the beginning of its mining heritage, Silverton has gone through periods of boom to bust. In the 1950s, the area was discovered by Hollywood, increasing its appeal to tourism, and in the 1960s, the Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad reinvested heavily to dedicate itself to tourist travel. Although mining continued on a limited basis up until the 1990s, Silverton's economy is now supported by those who come for its history, picturesque landscapes, fly fishing, jeeping, and hiking.

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$21.99

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Naugatuck Valley Textile Industry
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Naugatuck Valley Textile Industry

Part #: ARC-573533

Arcadia Publishing 


Naugatuck Valley Textile Industry. The textile industry found its roots in Connecticut along the banks of the Housatonic and Naugatuck Rivers between Waterbury and Bridgeport. From the early 1800s, when David Humphries, former aide-de-camp to Gen. George Washington, brought the woolen industry to America, to the 1950s, when the vast Sidney Blumenthal Mills moved to the South, the textile industry shaped life in the Naugatuck Valley. The industry witnessed labor actions, inspired cultural expression, and experienced the growth of shipping by road, water, and rail. Workers produced felted wool, cotton, and silk fabrics, velvet, fake fur, wool hosiery, buttons, ribbons, and various other goods, laying the foundation for the prosperity enjoyed by the valley today.

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Chattahoochee Valley Railway Company
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Chattahoochee Valley Railway Company

Part #: ARC-502991

Arcadia Publishing 


Chattahoochee Valley Railway Company. Weaving across state lines from Standing Rock, Alabama, through West Point, Georgia, and back to Bleecker, Alabama, the Chattahoochee Valley Railway served many communities along its line. Its last run was in 1992, but now the days of the short line railroad are revisited in Chattahoochee Valley Railway. Although some books on the history of the region render a passing mention of this railway, none have included over 200 images and a detailed historical account like Chattahoochee Valley Railway. The railroad served surrounding communities for over five generations by offering transportation, and the rail line's parent textile corporation built schools, churches, recreational areas, and a water supply for those communities. By the 1980s, modernization of the corporate structure eliminated the need for the railway and its equipment was sold off. However, part of its track bed is now a biking, hiking, and walking trail. The old railway is still serving nearby residents and is still enjoyed by all who follow its path.

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Mattoon and Charleston Area Railroads
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Mattoon and Charleston Area Railroads

Part #: ARC-552286

Arcadia Publishing 


Mattoon and Charleston Area Railroads. Railroads were instrumental to the development of Mattoon and Charleston, twin cities located in Coles County in east-central Illinois. The railroads enabled both cities to become regional centers for agriculture, industry, and commerce. The Illinois Central Railroad and New York Central System maintained shops, yards, and offices in Mattoon, while the Nickel Plate Road had shops, offices, and a yard in Charleston. In the early 20th century, the railroads were the major source of employment in both cities. Dozens of passenger trains stopped at the local stations. The phasing out of steam locomotives following World War II led to the closing of the shops. Railroad consolidation that began in the 1960s would lead to abandonment of routes and greatly diminish the importance of the railroads to the economies of Mattoon and Charleston.

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Laramie Railroads
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Laramie Railroads

Part #: ARC-130837

Arcadia Publishing 


Laramie Railroads. On July 1, 1862, President Lincoln signed the Pacific Railway Act. This act created the Union Pacific Railroad and authorized government loans and land grants to aid in the construction of the nation's first transcontinental railroad, which would connect Omaha, Nebraska, to Sacramento, California. As the Union Pacific raced west across prairies, mountains, and basins in 1867 and 1868, the Territory of Wyoming and many of its southern towns and cities were founded, including Laramie. In 1869, the Union Pacific met the Central Pacific at Promontory Summit, Utah, and the transcontinental railroad was complete. This is the story of the railroads of Laramie, a fabled place along the Union Pacific's Overland Route.

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Niwot Colorado: Birth of a Railroad Town
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Niwot Colorado: Birth of a Railroad Town

Part #: ARC-493585

Arcadia Publishing 


Niwot Colorado: Birth of a Railroad Town

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Notorious Jefferson County - Frontier Murder & Mayhem
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Notorious Jefferson County - Frontier Murder & Mayhem

Part #: ARC-299542

Arcadia Publishing 


Notorious Jefferson County - Frontier Murder & Mayhem. Before the Colorado Territory, this land was Jefferson Territory. Made up mostly of ranching and farming communities, early Jefferson County was the kind of place where only the stouthearted and downright crazy could survive. And with any settlement comes violence. It's true that Hollywood has embellished the history of the Wild West, but that doesn't mean it wasn't truly wild. From the "psychic" Italian mother who lured an elderly woman to her death to the violent end of the McQueary-Shaffer feud in the upper Platte region, local historian Carol Turner's Notorious Jefferson County offers readers a peek into some of the area's most famous and infamous murder cases of the frontier era.

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Cheyenne 1867-1917
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Cheyenne 1867-1917

Part #: ARC-558936

Arcadia Publishing 


Cheyenne 1867-1917. Cheyenne, known from its earliest days as the “Magic City of the Plains,” sprang up almost overnight in 1867 to meet the Union Pacific Railroad's anticipated westward expansion. Named after the Cheyenne Indian tribe that lived in the area, the wild frontier settlement quickly evolved from a tent town to one of the most sophisticated cities west of the Mississippi River. Cheyenne was settled by a variety of people, including cattle barons, soldiers from nearby Fort D. A. Russell, merchants, railroad workers, prostitutes, and gamblers. Buildings such as the Cheyenne Club, the Opera House, the Inter Ocean Hotel, the mansions along Ferguson Street, and a lively downtown defined Cheyenne as a prosperous city by the early 1880s. As Wyoming's capital grew, annual events such as Frontier Days brought the legend of Cheyenne into the first two decades of the 20th century.

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Around Rocky Mountain National Park
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Around Rocky Mountain National Park

Part #: ARC-133753

Arcadia Publishing 


Around Rocky Mountain National Park. Rocky Mountain National Park is often called “the crown jewel” of the nation's park system. Set in Colorado in the southern part of the Rocky Mountain chain, which forms the backbone of North America, the park contains 72 named peaks above 12,000 feet with the tallest of these, Longs Peak, rising to 14,259 feet. Established in 1915 as a national park, it now hosts more than two million visitors every year. Vacationers enjoy picnicking, hiking, camping, climbing, skiing, and simply admiring the beauties of the park, which include alpine plants, wildflowers, aspen, conifers, lakes, streams, waterfalls, and an abundance of birds and animals.

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Rails Around Denver
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Rails Around Denver

Part #: ARC-548029

Arcadia Publishing 


Rails Around Denver. At the height of America's post–Civil War expansion, Colorado Territory was a land of great hope and opportunity. Forged at the confluence of commerce and geography, Colorado became a state in 1876, and Denver, the Queen City of the Plains. To address the growing need for efficient transportation throughout the state, early railroads such as the Kansas Pacific and the Denver and Rio Grande were built in the 1870s. Serving all of these routes was the Denver Union Depot with its commodious dual-gauged tracks. These “steel roads” would become the region's economic lifeblood, hauling freight and passengers to the booming mountain mining towns, returning with ores for processing, and serving as the direct link for passengers and freight between the Rocky Mountains and the industrialized East.

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Brighton
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Brighton

Part #: ARC-569413

Arcadia Publishing 


Brighton, CO Book. The town of Brighton was founded by railroad man and real estate developer Daniel F. Carmichael at the junction of the Denver Pacific (now Union Pacific) and Denver and Boulder Valley Railroads. Carmichael determined, “There should be a town here that would do credit to the splendid valley.” The junction, originally named Hughes after the first president of the Denver Pacific Railroad, had a long history as a crossroads of the West. The town grew into an agricultural center for the Platte River Valley with a thriving sugar beet industry, dairies, and canning factories, but the changing economy would transform Brighton first into a suburban community and now into one of the fastest-growing cities in the United States.

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